Annapurna 1 Expedition

Annapurna 1 Expedition

Know before trip booking

Facts of Trip:

  • Trip Destination: Annapurna 1 Expedition
  • Group Size: 2 - 12
  • Highest Altitude: -
  • Grade: 3+
  • Transportation: Drive/ Flight
  • Type of Tour: Camping/ Tea House/ Lodge Trek
  • Trekking Hour: 6-7 Hrs / Day
  • Trip Cost: On Request

Trip Day to Day Itineary

Itinerary: A
Day 01: Arrive Kathmandu & Transfer to Hotel
Day 02:    Kathmandu , Prepare expedition
Day 03:    Kathmandu - Briefing in Ministry
Day 04:    Drive to Pokhara - Beni & Galeshowe
Day 05:    Galeshor - Tatopani
Day 06: Tatopani - Ghasa
Day 07:    Ghasa to Lete and River side
Day 08:    River side to Jungle camp
Day 09: Jungle camp to Miristi Khola
Day 10:    Miristi Khala - Annapurna North Base camp
Day 11-40: Climbing Peried of Annapurna 1 (8091m)
Day 41:    Annapurna Base camp to Miristi Khola
Day 42: Miristi Khola - Jungle Camp
Day 43: Jungle Camp to Lete
Day 44: Late to Tatopani
Day 45: Tatopani - Beni
Day 46:    Beni to Pokhara by drive
Day 47: Pokhara
Day 48: Drive to fly to Kathmandu
Day 49: Kathmandu
Day 50: Final Departure

Itinerary: B
Day 01: Arrive Kathmandu & Transfer to Hotel
Day 02: Kathmandu, Prepare expedition
Day 03: Kathmandu - Briefing in Ministry
Day 04: Drive to Pokhara
Day 05: Pokhara to fly with MI 17 Helicopter to Annapurna 1 North side base camp
Day 06-40: Climbing Peried of Annapurna 1 (8091m)
Day 41: Fly from Annapurna B.C to Pkhara by MI 17 Helicopter
Day 42: Pokhara
Day 43: Drive to fly to Kathmandu
Day 44: Kathmandu
Day 45: Final Departure

Trip Cost Details

Trip Cost Include

  • Expedition climbing Permit. Annapurna 1 ( 8091m)
  • 4 night 3*star hotel in Katmandu.
  • Transport  KTM- Pokhara -KTM  Or  flight
  • Experiences climbing Sherpa 2:1
  • All transportation expedition purpose.
  • Airport picks up and drops.
  • Liaison Officer Charge.
  • Expedition Guide and Cook, kitchen boys.
  • All kitchen equipments.
  • High altitude tents for high camps.
  • Private tent at base camp with mattress.
  • Dining Tents, kitchen tents, toilet tents,
  • All Necessary climbing gear except personal climbing gears.
  • Necessary number of porters to carry load and member baggage.
  • Porter’s equipment during the expedition.
  • All staff insurance.
  • All staff salary and porters wages.
  • All meal for member and staff during the expedition.
  • Quality high altitude dried foods & individual packet food.
  • EPI gas with burner for high camp.
  • Oxygen cylinder and Mask regulator for medical purpose!!
  • Gamow /PAC bag at base camp
  • First Aid Kit for all.

Communication :

  • Walky –Talky set
  • Sat phone pay call basis.

Power supply:

  • solar panel  for recharging purpose( camera ,sat phone, light in dining tents)

Trip Cost Exclude

  • High risk medical insurance
  • Visa& visa extension fees
  • Emergency rescue Evacuation if needed. 
  • Persona climbing equipment
  • Summit bonus of climbing sherpa
  • Tips.
  • Alcohol beverages & telephone calls, mineral water.
  • Lunch & dinner during Katmandu staying

Fixed Departure Dates

S.N. Start Date End Date Status Pax Book Remarks

Trip Information & Equipments

Climbing Equipment

  • Ice Axe w/Leash. General mountaineering tool. Sizing is important: under 5’7” use a 60cm tool; 5’7”- 6’1” use a 65cm tool; over 6’1” use a 70cm tool. (Too short is preferable to too long). Make sure you have a leash that is designed for use on a glacier axe. Please no technical leashes.
  • Crampons. With “step in” bindings and flat rather than “cookie cutter” frame rails anti balling plates OK. Keep in mind that ice specific crampons are for technical ice climbing and are not recommended for glacier travel. Anti-balling plates (optional).
  • Alpine climbing harness. Harness should fit over all clothing, have gear loops, adjustable leg loops and be reasonably comfortable to hang in. Make sure you can get into the harness without having to step through any part of it.
  • Carabiners (3) Locking; (3) Regular. 2 Twist lock & 1 small screw gate locker; 3 standard ovals recommended.
  • Climbing helmet. Alpine climbing helmet with sizing adjustments. Check to make sure helmet fits securely while wearing warm hat and balaclava.
  • Ascender (1). One right or one left.
  • Rappel/Belay device.
  • Prussiks. Or bring 40 feet of flexible 6mm accessory cord to make into prussiks.
  • Adjustable 3 Section Ski or Trekking poles. Optional but highly recommended. Helpful for non-snow covered ascents and descents if you have knee problems.

Footwear

  • Light hiking boots or trekking shoes. For day hikes and trek to Base Camp. The trail to Base Camp is rocky and rough. Shoes that are light weight, high comfort, plenty of room in the toe bed, with good support are important.
  • Tennis shoes or low top shoes. For international travel and town days. Optional.
  • Booties. Optional.
  • Camp Boots. Optional. Insulated boot for Base Camp.
  • High Altitude All-In-One Mountaineering Boot (also called triple boot or single boot system). Expedition boot that is a high altitude double boot with an integrated gaiter.
  • Wool or Synthetic Socks. 4 pair heavyweight socks to be worn over the liner socks. When layering socks, check fit over feet and inside boots.
  • Liner Socks. 4 pair of smooth thin wool, or synthetic to be worn next to the skin. Facilitates moving moisture away from your foot and helps reduces the incidence of blisters and hot-spots and makes the outer sock last longer before needing to be changed.
  • Booties. Down recommended.

Note: A High altitude double plastic boot in conjunction with a fully insulated overboot can substitute for the High Altitude All-In-One you will want to bring a pair of gaiters for lower on the mountain before switching to the insulated overboot.

Technical Clothing

  • Lightweight Long Underwear. 2-3 pair tops & bottoms, Capilene, other synthetic or wool. No Cotton. Lightweight is preferable as it is more versatile (worn single in warmer conditions and double layer for colder conditions.) Zip-T-neck tops allow more ventilation options. One set of white for intense sunny days on the glacier and one pair of dark for faster drying gives the most versatility.
  • Heavyweight Long Underwear. 1 pair. Expedition weight Capilene. (Alternative: a one-piece suit)
  • Lightweight Nylon Pants. 1 -2 pairs.
  • Short Sleeve Synthetic Shirt. 1-2 pairs.
  • Synthetic/Soft Shell Jacket. A full-zip version is easier to put on and has better ventilation than a pullover.
  • Soft Shell Pants. These highly breathable, water repellant, 4-way stretch, durable pants are worn when conditions are mild.
  • Insulated Synthetic Pants. Full separating side zippers (This is very important for ventilation. Full side zips also allow pants to be taken off without hav¬ing to remove boots).
  • Down Pants. To fit over insulation layers. Outer shell must be windproof.
  • Expedition down Parka. Fully Baffled, Expedition Weight, must have good hood.
  • Insulated Synthetic Jacket. Optional. Allows you to leave your down parka up higher on the mountain as we establish higher camps.
  • Hard Shell jacket w/ hood. We recommend a waterproof breathable shell material with full front zipper, underarm zips, and no insulation. This outer layer protects against wind and rain.
  • Hard Shell Pants. Waterproof, breathable. Full length side zippers preferred because it allows easy removal of pants, 7/8th zippers allowed but is more difficult to remove pants, no short lower leg zippers allowed.
  • Down Suit. (Optional) Would replace the Expedition down Jacket and Down Pants.

Handwear

  • Lightweight Synthetic gloves. 1 pair. Should fit comfortably inside mitts or gloves. Lighter capilene preferred.
  • Heavyweight Synthetic/Soft Shell gloves. 1 pair. Wind stopper is helpful
  • Expedition Shell Gloves w/ insulated removable liners. 1 pair. For use lower on the mountain when expedition mitt is not needed.
  • Expedition Shell Mitts. 1 pair. Should be big enough so that synthetic gloves fit inside pile liners.
  • Hand warmers and Toe Warmers: Bring 3 sets of each. Toe Warmers are different than hand warmers because they are formulated to work in a lower oxygen environment, like the inside of a boot; they also burn out more quickly.

Headwear

  • Headlamp. High quality LED headlamp. Bring plenty of spare batteries.
  • Glacier glasses (w/ side covers or wrap around). 100% UV, IR, high quality optical lenses designed for mountain use, must have side covers, leashes, and a nose guard is particularly helpful. No more than 8% light transmission. If you wear contact lenses we recommend packing a spare pair of glasses. If you wear glasses we recommend prescription glacier glasses (gray or amber). Talk to your eye care professional to find out where prescription glacier glasses are available.
  • Baseball cap/sun hat. One with a good visor to shade the nose and eyes.
  • Ski Goggles, 1 pair. 100% UV & IR.
  • Balaclava. (1) Heavyweight, (1) Lightweight. Heavyweight must fit over lightweight
  • Warm synthetic/wool hat.
  • Buff. can be used to shade your neck. or provide face protection
  • Neoprene face mask. Optional

Personal Equipment

  • Expedition Backpack. 3,500 - 4,000 cu. in. There are many great packs.
  • Trekking Backpack. 2,000 - 2,500 cu. in. (Optional)
  • Sleeping Bag. (Expedition quality rated to at least -40°F). Goose down preferred over synthetic for bulk and weight. If well-cared-for a down bag will last much longer than a synthetic bag. Your bag needs to be long enough that your feet are not pressing out the foot box which will make you colder. It should be roomy enough for comfortable sleeping but snug enough for efficient heat retention.
  • Sleeping Bag. (Expedition quality rated to at least -20°F). A second bag for Base Camp. This avoids the carrying of the Expedition Bag up and down the mountain after the higher camps are established.
  • Self Inflating pads(2). Two 3/4 or full length pads. One for use at basecamp and one for camps higher on the moutain. If you are over 6’ a long is recommended. Make sure to include a repair kit.
  • Closed-Cell foam pad. Full length closed cell is recommended, used while staying at camps higher than bascamp and to be used in combination with your self inflating pad.
  • Cooking Gear: Cup: 16oz. plastic insulated mug with snap-on lid (retains heat well and is spill-resistant in the tent). Some prefer a non-insulated mug for warming hands.
  • Spoon: Good quality tough plastic (lexan).
  • Bowl: Plastic Tupperware type with 2-3 cup capacity and lid.
  • Sunscreen. SPF 40 or better, 2 small tubes. Make sure that you have new sunscreen.
  • Lipscreen. SPF 20 or better, at least 2 sticks. Make sure your lipscreen is new.
  • Water Bottles: 2 to 3 Wide mouth bottles with minimum 1 Litre capacity per bottle. No water bag or bladder systems, they freeze or are hard to fill.
  • Water Bottle parkas for the big bottles.
  • Toiletry bag. Include toilet paper, hand sanitizer and small towel (as well as tooth brush, tooth paste etc.)
  • Pee Bottle (1 Liter). Large mouth, clearly marked water bottle for use in tent.
  • Pee Funnel (for women). It is a good idea to practice, practice, and practice. For use in tent.
  • Camp Knife or Multi Tool. Medium sized. Keep the knife simple.
  • Thermos. 1 Liter capacity. Needs to be strong. Stainless Steel Vacuum bottle.
  • Trash Compactor bags (4). To line stuff sacks to keep gear dry & one large enough to line pack. At minimum 3 mil. thick.
  • Camera gear. Optional. We recommend a small digital camera above BC. Simple and light. For more information, see recommendations on the FAQ page of our website.
  • Compression Stuff Sacks. Especially for sleeping bags and clothing.

Traveling

  • 2 Large duffle bags w/ travel locks. Used for transporting your gear.
  • Base Camp Items. It is good to bring additional items which you have found to be useful on previous expeditions. For example: paperback books, playing cards,MP3 flash player, short-wave radio, game boys, musical instruments, ear plugs, lots of batteries, etc.
  • Travel Clothes. A set of clean clothes is nice to have to change into after the trip.

First Aid

  • Small personal first-aid kit. (Simple and Light) Aspirin, Moleskin, molefoam, waterproof first-aid tape, athletic tape, Band-Aids, personal medica¬tions, etc. The guides will have extensive first-aid kits, so leave anything extra behind. Let your guide know about any medical issues before the climb.
  • Drugs/Medications/Prescriptions. Climbers should bring Mupirocin (Bactroban) cream, excellent topical antibiotic for scrapes and cuts. Cirpro¬floxin (Cipro) 500mg tablets for traveler’s diarrhea and for urinary tract infections. Loperamide (Lomotil) or Immodium for diarrhea. Azithromycin (Z-pak) 250mg tablets for non-gastrointestinal infections. Acetazolamide (Diamox) 125 or 250mg tablets for alltitude sickness. Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) 200mg tablets for altitude headaches, sprains aches, etc. Excedrin,Acetaminophen (Tylenol) 325mg tablets for stomach sensitivity.

This list is only a guide. While you are required to bring everything on this list, there are numerous options, brands, and versions of each piece of equipment; you can search near by your home town market or out of country

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Contact Details

Himalayan Ecstasy Nepal Treks & Expedition Pvt. Ltd.
Thamel, Kathmandu,Nepal
(Opposit the Pilgrim book shop)
P.O. Box: 12353,  Phone: +977 1 4700001, Land line   Mobile: +977 9851077481 (Anil)   Mobile:+977 9851126622 (Sujan)
  Fax: +977  (1) 4700001
Email: info@himalayanecstasynepal.com
            himalayanecstasy@gmail.com Website: www.himalayanecstasy.com